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Patch's Poll: Do You Vote in Political Primaries?

Connecticut voters head to the polls tomorrow to cast ballots for their choice Democratic or Republican candidates in the U.S. Senate, 2nd and 5th District races.

When all is said and done, political primaries that do not involve a presidential race aren’t exactly huge draws for voters.

Historically, only the most politically aware or involved Democrats and Republicans in Connecticut head to the polls to vote for their choice candidates in federal elections.

The same will happen on Tuesday, when registered party members will be able to vote in the lone statewide contest for U.S. Senate. F

or the Democrats, its Chris Murphy versus Susan Bysiewicz and for the Republicans, its Linda McMahon versus Chris Shays.

Polls open at 6 a.m. and close at 8 p.m.

According to CTNewsJunkie.com, party analysts are expecting roughly a 25-percent turnout of registered voters on both sides. The news site pointed out that the hotly contested Fifth District race will likely be higher in terms of a percentage of voters, given the fact that the seat remains open.

And 25 percent sounds about right.

According to statistics on the Secretary of the State’s website, back in 2010, roughly 30 percent (122,321 voters) of registered Republicans voted in the U.S. Senate primary between Linda McMahon, Rob Simmons and Peter Schiff. On the Republican gubernatorial front, about 29 percent (120,171 voters) cast ballots in the three-way race between Tom Foley, Michael Fedele and Oz Griebel.

On the Democratic side, about 24 percent (180,926 voters) cast ballots in the race between Dannel P. Malloy and Ned Lamont.

The number of registered Republicans in 2010 was 407,407, while the number of registered Democrats was 739,224, according to the website YourCt.com.

By comparison, voter turnout in one of the most notable primary races in recent memory — the 2006 upset victory when Ned Lamont beat out Joe Lieberman — garnered 43 percent of registered Democrats in Connecticut.

What about you? Do you vote in primaries in Connecticut? Do you even care? Take our poll and share your thoughts in the comments.

Bion Shepard August 13, 2012 at 08:07 PM
I vote, otherwise only the radical votes win.
DisgruntledInClinton August 13, 2012 at 08:09 PM
It is our American (legal citizens, that is) duty.
sam August 13, 2012 at 09:28 PM
I do, and it’s a shame that most people don’t as it allows the Party elite/insiders to select who is to represent us. That’s not how it’s supposed to work. For example, I would no more vote for EITHER Party’s endorsed candidate for Senate than I would stick needles in my eyes. Both will be disastrous for CT.
Daria Novak August 14, 2012 at 02:41 AM
I always vote. Those who fail to join a political party, any party, lose the right to choose who the candidates are representing their party. It's a shame to see so citizens voting to select their party's choice for office. My wish for tomorrow is that many turn out for the primaries as we need to again recognize that voting is how we the people make our voice and our opinions heard in Hartford and Washington. It is our duty, a privilege and indeed a responsibility as citizens to participate in the process that keeps us free from tyranny. So many around the world have died for this right and in America, too often, we ignore or consider it a bother. Now that the 2 major parties are fielding candidates that differ in their views, voters again have a real choice in the primaries and in November.
Ann Della Camera August 14, 2012 at 03:18 AM
I vote, to be sure my voice is heard. If you don't vote, don't complain about conditions.
George August 14, 2012 at 11:37 AM
Choosing to not join a political party is failure?
Lise Cavallaro August 14, 2012 at 12:16 PM
Choosing not to vote at all is a failure.
Lise Cavallaro August 14, 2012 at 12:16 PM
I never voted in the primaries until the past two years. Just voted this morning.
Daria Novak August 14, 2012 at 05:12 PM
Anyone care to guess what the percentage of turnout will be in Madison or, overall, in the state? Think about this... probably about 20% of voters will turn out to vote today. Of that number 50% plus one can nominate a party's candidate. So the magic number really controlling the outcome could be a paltry 10% of the electorate in a party. Make your voice heard, no matter what political party you belong to and go vote today! It is high time we started getting more active so that we the people have more of a say in who governs us. Big money, unions, Big PACs won't be able to force an election result if the voters reject the candidate in the polling booth. In America, we the people select who we want to govern us. Let's teach that to our nation's youth and re-apply a culture of civic participation to our teachings.

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